HR NEWS

Brain zapping may restore social behaviour in autistic kids

Brain zapping may restore social behaviour in autistic kids

Scientists have identified a brain region that can be stimulated to correct social impairments in autistic children. The research from the University of Texas (UT) in the US provides the first evidence that a specific part of the cerebellum, a region near the brain stem that has long been thought to only have roles in coordinating movement, is critical for autistic behaviours. It also establishes a more accessible target for brain stimulation than many autism-related neural circuits that are buried deep within the brain’s folds. “This is potentially quite a powerful finding. From a therapeutic standpoint, this part of the cerebellum is an enticing target,” said Peter Tsai, from UT Southwestern Medical Centre. “And although neuromodulation would not cure the underlying genetic cause of a person’s autism, improving social deficits in children with autism could make a huge impact on their quality of life,” Tsai said. The research, published in the journal Nature Neuroscience, utilised neuromodulation to demonstrate that humans and mice have parallel connections between specific domains within the cerebellum and cerebral cortex that have been implicated in autism studies.

Subsequent phases of the study showed that disrupting the function within the cerebellar domain resulted in autistic behaviours and that brain stimulation corrected social impairment in mice.

The next step is to ensure the same technique would be safe to conduct on children. Although doctors have safely applied cerebellar neuromodulation to disorders such as schizophrenia, it has not been studied in children with autism. “This area of the brain has not received the attention it deserves in regards to understanding autism,” said Tsai. Most of the focus of autism research has been on the cortex, a region of the brain associated with cognition, he added.

“Our findings have prompted new thoughts on how the cerebellum may be involved in autism and most importantly suggest that the cerebellum could be a therapeutic target for treatment,” said Tsai.

8 months ago

By HR Reporters

Related Tags :   • Health News

Social Share : Share      

Comments.....

Submit new comment

Most Viewed

Kids with chronic illness show signs of mental health problems...

7 months ago

Orange boss and tycoon Bernard Tapie sent to trial in France: Report...

8 months ago

Tim Hortons responds to franchisees’ ‘reckless’ benefits cuts...

7 months ago

Frail older adults may experience delirium after surgery...

7 months ago

WHO stamps Himachal Pradesh doctor low-cost protocol for rabies prophylaxis...

6 months ago

Alberta MLA 'deeply regrets' firing woman who made sex harassment complaint...

7 months ago

Bipolar disorder has seven key factors: Study...

8 months ago

Plea to verify HR&CE dept official’s qualification...

7 months ago

Kaspersky Lab names Bhayani new General Manager for South Asia...

10 months ago

Omega-3s from fish more effective in cancer prevention...

7 months ago

Most Shared

Mass redundancies for Quebec cookie factory...

2 years ago

Trump this: 5 bold predictions for how he’ll impact HR...

2 years ago

InfoTycoon appoints existing President and COO Kevin George to succeed James Dav...

2 years ago

Sushant Dwivedy joins Aspiring Minds as SVP-Enterprise Client Solutions...

2 years ago

Uber introduces special reward programme...

2 years ago

Standard Chartered Bank to reduce 10% corporate & institutional banking staff...

2 years ago

National CineMedia (NCM) creates Affiliate Partnerships team, names Stacie Tursi...

2 years ago

OCC Names New CFO, Treasurer, and Chief Compliance Officer...

2 years ago

Beards at work are now a major turn-off say 61% of female office workers...

2 years ago

First female fast jet pilot of Britain hired as director at PwC...

2 years ago